Sunday, September 24, 2017

assorted Sunday snippets


in which our plucky heroine is has a busy weekend, with much culling, consolidating, decluttering and reconfiguring...

Blue Cedar House helped me, and in addition to their usual effort on the yard, which looks amazingly tidy (weeded/mowed/raked - the broken branches from the plum thicket went into yard waste, the fallen plums into compost) thank you Mindy! we also tackled several aspects of the workroom

photo partway through dealing with one of the two shelf units; they are going to be rebuilt in a more visually calm and earthquake safer (ie closed shelving with sliding doors instead of open shelf) configuration. I removed the two topmost shelves which I could only barely reach even when on a stepladder, and am keeping the lower three shelves to a height I can reach the contents when standing on the floor.

This was a perfect opportunity to look through everything on those shelves. There were a few things better suited to Goodwill, and a number of things that were either not supplies for handicraft, or that obviously had elsewhere homes, they got moved. Other things needed to be repacked in smaller more easily accessed boxes. (for example, rather than one huge box of textile art supplies, there is now a box of fabric paint, one of dyestuff, one of speedball textile ink, and one of carved blocks for printing) I am getting closer to my goal: with supplies organised and at hand for the activities I want to do and to teach.

The side panels are all cut to size, as are the tempered masonite doors. Still a lot of smaller cuts for blocking and cleats, to mount the sides and make door slides, but that is within my skillset and tools. I had Mr Blue Cedar do all the cutting of lumber and sheet stock.

These are the empty boxes, formerly also on the shelf in the previous photo, that we either consolidated the contents or sent the contents to Goodwill

In addition, the table base formerly just outside the back door got a new plywood top, and moved indoors to be an additional standing workspace in the workshop, just as I had envisioned it, AND there is a new slightly smaller table outside the back door, build entirely of salvaged wood parts already here in stash! so I don't lose the functionality of a spot outside the door to set down laundry basket or chicken food. I rather designed it on the fly, looking at what was in the wood stash already, and Farbjorn valiantly built it to my specs. The only thing we had to purchase was about $2 of hardware. It will be a more useful place to store some of the smaller garden tools etc, and there is room on the side between the table and the house, to tuck away about half of the long garden tools neatly (hoe, shovels, fruit picker, etc...)

and, in addition, before I forget, we also did a sort and clear of the food freezer contents, and removed all the mystery items, and everything obviously outdated, which created another bag of compostables. I have realised that if I create leftovers, or make broth from leftovers, that it would be better to eat it immediately rather than put in the freezer "for later"... Plus, very exciting, found some assorted packages of ham, bacon, and burgers in the depths of the freezer that will be good additions to current meal planning
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Earlier this week, I continued my frustrating journey to create a pattern for a woven top that fits me comfortably, a project I have attempted several times in the last ten or fifteen years, so far unsuccessfully. This is my third muslin of this iteration, and I am actually pleased so far, although I have yet to tackle the most difficult part, the dreaded sleeve!
. .
These photos show that the horizontal balance lines are actually pretty horizontal, and aside from some subtle fitting issues still showing (uneven neckline, and some excess fabric in the upper back, and at the top of the side panel, the bodice actually fits me. Which would be great, if I wanted to make a vest. But I want a blouse, or shirt...

Sleeves are tricky, once you step away from the standard measurements, and I want a sleeve that I can move my arms in all directions, so as to be able to do my vocation and avocation without impediment. The sleeve pattern that goes with this Tabula Rasa jacket/shirt pattern is a cut on sleeve, and it binds my arm quite unmercifully as drafted. I am debating not only recutting it with more ease in the bicep, but also whether to add a gusset, a swing back gore, or both

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September SMART goals (x=extra)
# THINGS MADE THINGS FIXED THINGS GONE
1 dark pelican enamel declutter workroombag to Goodwill
2 tweedledee poncho declutter workroombag to Goodwill
3 color wheels standing workbench box of wool fleece
4 charter painting x yard waste bin
5 Jen paisley pinaforex recycle paper bin
6 new back door table x yard waste bin
7 x x freezer mysteries
8 x x ø
9 x x ø
10 x x ø
11 x x x
12 x x x
13 x x x
14 x x x
15 x x x

Monday, September 18, 2017

Monday musings...


in which our plucky heroine is grateful for rain...

It started raining yesterday evening... soft gentle rain, but intermittently relentless. This is good, it will help quench the fires, though the rain itself causes other damage after fire, the landslide danger is much increased... but here in the city, the air is beginning to clear
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I have tried repeatedly over many years to find/create/fit a TNT woven blouse pattern, with no real success. Since others have had good success with the Tabula Rasa jacket and shirt variations pattern, I decided to give it a try. I do expect to have to make multiple efforts to adjust the pattern, as is always the case when I try and work out a new basic garment for myself.

Here is the schematic of the pattern pieces I am using. Because I want to make a woven button-front blouse/shirt, I am not using the vee neck jacket front, but the adapted front pattern piece from the corresponding "shirt variations" pattern from the same company. Hence in the schematic, I have indicated the difference in the pattern by a dotted line:


muslin #1 - only alteration is to use L for upper torso, shifting to XL at mid armscye to allow for bust, as suggested by pattern designer. Horizontal balance lines look mostly okay. Bust darts are at a good level. There is PLENTY of ease around the bust on the front. Shoulder seams are, unfortunately, at least 1" to the outside of where my shoulder joins my body, which is always the case.

Back is not entirely level, probably needs both a rounded back adjustment, and some room for my hips/bottom.

Sleeves are the worst problem, as is always the case. Shoulder seams are, unfortunately, at least 1" to the outside of where
my shoulder joins my body, which is always the case. In this pattern the sleeve cap seam is intended to be just inside the shoulder point.

Also, I cannot easily move my both my arms forward at the same time, or even one arm at a time. While there is enough ease in the arms if I stand rigidly straight, as soon as I move, the upper arms tighten and pull. Not sure how to adjust for this, since it doesn't match any of the alterations suggested in the information provided. Am thinking that somehow adding to the back of the sleeve cap would be helpful?

So, on to muslin #2...
in an attempt to observe what each specific change will do, I am only making one major change at a time...

major change - moved the shoulder 1" narrower (tapered along the front panel down to notch, darted out extra on back so as to not lose any width)
minor adjustment - restitched the back side panel to center back seams to increase taper and allow a bit more space in the side hip (this only added about a half inch on either side back, not enough)

this is moving in the right direction, but nowhere near a comfy blouse yet... I can tell that there is still too much width in the upper bodice center front, and not enough in the lower "peplum" zone (when I sit down, it binds across my tummy as well as across my hips in the back; when I stand up there is enough room in the lower front, but it still hangs up and binds across the hips in the back.

the vertical balance lines are getting closer to being vertical;
horizontal balance lines still looking good

back is still pulling upward in the center, needs either a RBA or for me to add a center back seam to shape the back. The lower edge is still not wide enough to fit my curvy hips properly... I am considering cutting the back into panels, rather like princess seams. This would allow me to fit the ins and outs of my contours more easily, and would also probably be more sparing of fabric when I eventually am able to make this as an actual blouse.
The thing I am pleased about, aside from having the bust darts in the right place, is that the hemline edge is basically level, in the front and on the side panels. Sleeve is still terrible, but I need to sort out the front shoulder and center front issues first, then deal with the back shaping, and only then will I be able to try and fit the sleeves in some way that will allow me to freely move my arms.

Tomorrow I am going to work on muslin #3. I have removed the sleeves entirely for now, and will work on sorting out the center front shoulder zone. Overall, I am quite pleased though, as this is already closer to a usable blouse/shirt bodice than I have ever managed before!! My goal in fitting this pattern is to create a comfortable blouse/shirt that I will be able to wear underneath my everyday pinafore, which is what I wear every day, autumn through spring, which will add an important additional option to my short list of TNT patterns. (my basic TNT patterns so far include a knit top, pinafore/dress, princess seam sleeveless dress, and knit cropped pants. Also a sports bra, and a wraparound apron)
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September SMART goals (x=extra)
# THINGS MADE THINGS FIXED THINGS GONE
1 dark pelican enamel xø
2 tweedledee poncho xø
3 color wheels x ø
4 charter painting x ø
5 xx ø
6 x x ø
7 x x ø
8 x x ø
9 x x ø
10 x x ø
11 x x x
12 x x x
13 x x x
14 x x x
15 x x x


Saturday, September 16, 2017

Tweedledee completed


in which our plucky heroine succeeds in planning for warmth...

although warmth is not yet needful... I've had the pattern for the mini-poncho printed out for years, long after the site disappeared and the designer discontinued it. Even more surprisingly, there are zero other reviews on Ravelry, so it must not have been a popular concept. Indeed, the pattern calls for making up the garment in pieces and stitching them together, rather than in the currently popular top down all in one go method. I prefer to make up knitting in pieces, at least for adult garments, as otherwise one is required to tote along a vast mass of wool if taking knitting anywhere, which I do.

Knit in pieces is much less cumbersome, but makes up for it by having to faff with all the loose yarn ends as part of the finishing up process. There were, I think, about 14 sets of yarn ends I had to darn in, each set consisting of three individual strands, since I knit three different colors of yarn together to make a nicely bulky and visually tweedy fabric. The grey and brown combined with the misty turquoise to make one of the subtle colorways that I love, and that will coordinate with almost all of my cool weather clothing.

Nonetheless, I am quite pleased that I finally knitted it up, as it should be a most Useful Garment as well as part of my autumn 6PAC efforts:

not yet sketched are my hopeful attempts to create a useable woven top pattern

Next up for my personal sewing will be working on a toile for the Tabula Rasa pattern, in an effort to come up with a TNT pattern for making self some woven blouses, to add variety to my wardrobe. However difficult the process, I know that once I succeed, it will make me very happy to begin to sew up the assorted fabrics I have set aside for the project of wardrobe refurbishment


Sunday, September 10, 2017

Sunday snippets


in which our plucky heroine notices a momentary halo...

Apparently the bike lanes on the nearby primary street were just repainted, which process also includes the liberal sprinkling of reflective glass spheres. As I was riding home on my bike earlier today, my shadow was cast ahead and slightly to the right, the sun not having reached full height in the sky. A curious effect of a small but bright rainbow*, was following along slightly ahead of my shadow, apparently from the excess of microspheres, and a slight, quick, turn of my head showed that the rainbow formed an pennanular curve around my cycling shadow self. It was a most curious effect. I tried stopping to see if I could capture it with my cell phone camera, but the effect seemed to be predicated on movement somehow. In difficult times any glimpse of beauty is a benison.

*edited to add, that the scientific name of the phenomenon is called "a glory", and there is, of course, an optical explanation. Thank you to my Berkeley friend Flieg for the additional info.
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Back in the dawn of time, when I was a child (and the soft hot rocks made it difficult to keep the crayons from melting...) instead of giving crayola colors amusing descriptive names like "inchworm", and "jazzberry jam", the colors had simple names like "blue-violet", and "yellow-green", for example, which made it more obvious how combining colors led to more interstitial colors. This painted example of the color wheel (I made up outline coloring wheels to share with my charter painting students) is one possible useful and handy way to think about colors. I assumed everyone learned this in grade school, but not necessarily.
This is a more complex split primary color wheel; by starting with a warm and cool color of each of the three primary colors, more subtle secondary colors can be created. I realised once I started that this color wheel was a bit beyond the needs and available time for a single hour and a half introductory painting class. It was fun, however, to draw up the master for this, I got to use some of my geometry templates and triangles...
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I should mention that in fact, I did teach a new workshop on Saturday - Introduction to Charter Painting. It was intended for encouraging beginners to try their hand at charter painting, which is basically "illumination made easy". Charters are xerox copies of SCA award scrolls (certificates), with the calligraphy already done, and the design in place, as outlined motifs. Hence, painting a charter is a bit like coloring in a coloring book, only with gouache paint instead of markers or crayons, and often with a bit of additional embellishment. I greatly enjoy painting charters as a form of meditative relaxation, so encouraging others to also give it a try was not a terribly difficult step. I think that the class was pretty well received, and with some editing of the handout sheet, it could also be taught as a fun short workshop for modern folks as well...

Tuesday, September 5, 2017

this is not red dot...


in which our plucky heroine needs more tears in her eyes...

...this is the Moon, her face obscured by smoke, and not a lunar eclipse. Ash falls from the sky like gentle evil snow, and kisses my cheeks as I ride my bike to go grocery shopping. The sky in Portland is filled with smoke from many fires, and ash from the Eagle Creek fire, started by youths throwing fireworks off a cliff into dry brush, that is now burning almost 6000 acres just to the east up the Columbia gorge, and threatening several towns. I get home from the mile ride to the store, and my face is dappled with black ash spots, the corners of my eyes are gritty with ashes. I cannot cry enough...



Monday, September 4, 2017

Monday musings


in which our plucky heroine tries not to have a sucky week, aka starting over...

I am hoping and doing what I can to have this week be an improvement. There is a lot that needs to get done, including all the carryover from last week that of necessity got put on hold, and also quite an additional bit that I want to get done.

Today, in the USA, it is Labor Day, a holiday now associated with picnics and barbecues, but in fact commemorating the efforts of the labor unions, which in the past century did much to improve the lives of ordinary working folks...
 
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And here are a few of my favorite union type songs...

I first heard this man sing back when I was 17;
he is one of my heros...


hunting down some U Utah Phillips,
I ran across this Leonard Cohen gem I'd not heard before...


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I keep looking outside and thinking... the light is wrong. That kind of golden sunset light should not be coming from the east and not at this hour of the morning... Then I cough, and remember how much of the PNW is burning. From my time in Idaho when we were on evacuation alert, I can extrapolate how eversomuch worse it must be, closer to the fires. Here in the city, we are not in physical danger of burning, though like all who breathe the smoke, the insidious damage of particulates spreads widely and with effects both immediate and long term. My ongoing inhale and exhale must continue however, and cannot be postponed until clearer skies...
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On Saturday night I finished the enamel for my current custom regalia commission. Just needed to make the setting and mail it out. On Sunday morning, my student picked it up to admire it, and accidentally dropped it on the concrete studio floor. Not really repairable, as re-firing didn't work out well, so am back to the start again. I am trying to not be upset. A two day delay at this point is not a big deal, but two days in front of the hot kiln... and, of course, I had already written to my client sending him a progress photo. Ah well, can't be cured, can't make it didn't happen, and can't run the movie backwards. Accidents happen... not upset with my student, but not looking forward to more time in front of the 1500F kiln for the next day or days... hopefully I will get the third enamel done before the temperatures hit triple digits later this afternoon...

One and done! Third time is the charm... worked almost round the clock to get this third iteration of this enamel completed. I actually like the bird eyes on this one better than the one that was broken. now to make a setting for it, probably tomorrow when I am a little less exhausted. Color on the photo is a little bit off, due to sky being the wrong color today

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Well dang! I spaced out about signing up for the digital design for laser engraving workshop at the library later this autumn... meant to stay up till midnight last Friday night so I could get my name on the list. Now I am on the wait list, anyway... sigh... I was excited about learning some new technical things, in a format intended for beginners, hopefully they will offer the series for adults again another time, maybe next year. The class is about learning to use the equipment in the Makerspace at Rockwood Library... It is mostly only available to teens, which is why I was so excited that they were offering a class for adults. They have all kinds of cool tools there, and I would like to learn to use the laser cutter to create stencils or possibly to carve blocks for block printing
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September SMART goals (x=extra)
# THINGS MADE THINGS FIXED THINGS GONE
1 dark pelican enamel øø
2 ø øø
3 ø ø ø
4 ø ø ø
5 øø ø
6 x x ø
7 x x ø
8 x x ø
9 x x ø
10 x x ø
11 x x ø
12 x x ø
13 x x x
14 x x x
15 x x x

Friday, September 1, 2017

Friday fragments


in which our plucky heroine wonders if the rain will ever come...

The PNW is on fire. I just read that Yosemite is on fire. My friend in LA is on evacuation watch, because fire. Our heat waves here are returning, and bringing with them smoke from all the fires, again... I have not seen such skies since I was a child in LA, more than fifty years ago, before the clean air act, when inversion layers and smog were a way of life, and the mountains only ever appeared in the wintertime.
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Whatever went south with my right foot seems to have eased off. I am walking a bit better, in that I can put weight on my foot again. If it isn't back to normal by Monday Tuesday, I will contact my regular doctor. Ever since my dear friend S almost died from an long undiagnosed foot infection that attacked her bones, I am very cautious about foot trouble.
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September is "Sewing Month - " National Sewing Month began in 1982 with a proclamation from President Ronald Reagan declaring September as National Sewing Month “In recognition of the importance of home sewing to our Nation.”...

In an attempt to add yet more to my everyday efforts, I am going to spend a half hour every day doing something sewing related all month long. I have gathered the supplies I need to begin the work to fit Tabula Rasa as a woven shirt/jacket/blouse (I have tissue paper, and several old sheets for muslins)

It is also the annual Sewing Room Spiff-up Month on Stitchers Guild. If I had nothing else on my agenda, I would focus the entire month on sorting and reorganising my fabric collection. I will likely do some of that, and also want to make a new ironing board cover, and make padded covers for the sleeve board (sans covers) that I found at Goodwill a few years ago, which has been languishing in the workshop ever since. After all, if I am eventually going to make some woven sleeved garments, being able to press their sleeves will be very helpful!

Not sure where I found this photo online, but it shows a way to keep the long edges of the ironing/sleeve board covers neatly attached along their long sides. Since both my ironing board, and the sleeve board are wooden, I can take advantage of this option pretty easily. (note tiny nails that are used to stretch the drawstring and keep the cover taut on the upper side)
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I found this essay well worth reading: The Migration Habits of Stones
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September SMART goals (x=extra)
# THINGS MADE THINGS FIXED THINGS GONE
1 ø øø
2 ø øø
3 ø ø ø
4 ø ø ø
5 øø ø
6 x x ø
7 x x ø
8 x x ø
9 x x ø
10 x x ø
11 x x ø
12 x x ø
13 x x x
14 x x x
15 x x x

Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Tuesday tidbits and tears


in which our plucky heroine is limping rather badly...

This morning something went really wrong with my right foot, the one that is mostly functional most of the time. Intense pain, and I have a really high pain threshold. After a callback from the nurse hotline about what to do next, I got a ride to urgent care. After a two hour wait, urgent care thinks my foot isn't broken, (didn't do any xrays, because I didn't twist my ankle or drop anything on my foot?) and thinks there isn't any infection because there is no wound and no external redness. Still hurts like the dickens, I am using up spoons not to be crying, and foot is still slightly swollen. Their diagnosis is "strain of unknown origin"; their recommendation is to put foot up often, use ice, use Voltaren, try and stay off it, and if not better in three or four days, get seen again.

I made it clear that I was not there for antibiotics or for pain meds, but that I wanted to know what had gone wrong and how not to have it go wrong in the future, because not being able to walk freely is a quality of life issue for me. I need to be able to stand, and to walk about my house (and my neighborhood) in order to have any kind of life at all. Sorry, I am frustrated. My body is not cooperating.
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This strip by Lunarbabboon made me cry: "Stay"

These sculptures by Ronan Halpin make me happy

Amanda Palmer is always worth listening to -
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I really fell down this month as far as my decluttering goals. Not going to catch up in the next few days, or even the next few weeks, as work is taking a bit of priority right now, but I need to get back to making more steady progress...
August SMART goals (x=extra)
# THINGS MADE THINGS FIXED THINGS GONE
1 rainbow baby hat buttons sewn onbag to Goodwill
2 cloudlight paper towel holder upbag to Goodwill
3 x x bundle of wood
4 x x ø
5 xx ø
6 x x ø
7 x x ø
8 x x ø
9 x x ø
10 x x ø
11 x x x
12 x x x
13 x x x
14 x x x
15 x x x

Monday, August 28, 2017

cloudlight created


cloudlight = a structure to allow electrification of the paper entryway lanterns

I have had this design gradually taking form in my mindseye for a number of years, as a way to add additional ambient light to my poorly-lit living room, ever since our plucky heroine started collecting paper lanterns for the entryway, years ago... Last week, Farbjorn and I worked together to turn the concept into reality:...

A paper pattern, that was initially taped to the ceiling to mark the centers of the lanterns, then had the circumference of the lanterns drawn on each center, then a pleasing shape created to allow for running the cords to the wall. The panel is just under five feet long, and about 2 1/2 feet wide. With undulations. I used up about half a pad of tracing paper to create the pattern, taped together sheet by sheet (annoying but necessary)

Once the design was marked on the 1/4" plywood, Farbjorn used the jigsaw to cut out the stylised cloud shape:

Scraps of 2 x 4 are attached to the ceiling to create a chase between the plywood and the ceiling, to allow space for electrical cords run to each lantern. pretty chuffed that I had almost all the hardware needed for this project here to hand. Little brackets, wood screws, sheetrock screws, and the last of my Big Box of wall anchors.
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initial cloudlight panel, with keyhole openings pierced to allow the lamp fixtures to hang below the panel, while disguising the four cords behind a sculptural design. I had recently bought a chicken waterer kit online, that came with a set of hole saws... have yet to put the waterer together, but the hole saw came in right handy for this project! Rather than try for evenly opaque white paint, I decided that layers of thinned white paint in irregular cloudlike shapes would be more interesting visually.

Revised cloudlight panel with shaped layers of additional painted plywood to add extensions that will help obscure the blocking. Sight angles were not something I truly considered with the original design... I had to redesign my concept and add an additional layer of individual cloud panels, due to an error in blocking placement on my part, which meant that it turned from a one day project to a two day project... with luck, the revised design will look turned out to be even more interesting, or at the very least, like "I meant to do that..."

a closer view of one of the painted second layers of the cloudlight panel...

The revised panel, in situ.

four lamp fixture cordsets were fed through the allocated openings in the panel, here awaiting the return of the paper lanterns. It turned out that the keyhole openings worked well enough at holding the cords in place that no additional anchors were needed in that spot to keep the cords at desired length.

paper lanterns in place, waiting for the power strip to be attached to the wall near the lone outlet, on the other side of the big front window...

and... finally... the cloudlight is illuminated!

Whichever direction you look at it, the contuours change...

This shows *where* in Acorn Cottage the cloudlight is located - exactly as I had imagined. It forms a sculptural light installation between the front door and the living room, thus both defining the entry space, and adding a lot of ambient light to the social area of the house, which was in great need of more light.

The paper diffused light, which is much more lambent than the photos show. Eventually I plan to put a long strand of tiny white fairy lights all round just inside the edge of the plywood panel, but that will have to wait until they go on sale.

Sunday, August 27, 2017

scavenger hunt Sunday


in which our plucky heroine makes progress...
my pal Randal organised "The Epic Photo Scavenger Hunt", as an online challenge between August 1st and October 31st. There are 67 items on the list, I had six the first week, the second week added another ten... the third week added five more, and this week added six more -
17. five
I noticed that the eggs from Boneclaw Mother and Nanny Og (my backyard hens) made a lovely design. Even more than I like the five eggs, I like the five different reflections in the steel bowl of my kitchen scale.

36. a silhouette
Farbjorn installs the cloudlight panel above my entryway. What pleased me about this image was the different levels of lighting, from the silhouette of his head to the way the light played along the panel with hard and soft shadows on the ceiling...


42. a sunset
setting sun seen through heavy smoke, view from Willamette bluff across to the west hills, early in August, when the smoke from multiple fires across the PNW blanketed the city.

47. a freight train
in front of Kate and Dublin's house, the train tracks are busy with freight trains, and with passenger trains. Caught this one in the morning while we waited for the eclipse to start.

48. an empty parking lot
New Seasons Arbor Lodge, just after closing, at about 11:05 PM

59. front page of newspaper
I'm hoping that this is the most exciting newspaper front page to show up between now and the end of October, I much prefer natural occurrences to politics.

Saturday, August 26, 2017

Saturday snippets


in which our plucky heroine braces for the return of hot weather

Though hopefully not as bad as earlier this year! NOAA has us forecast for not only an incoming heat wave, warm nighttime temperatures, but also the return of "patchy smoke" by Sunday night. I know it is much worse in the fire zones, but I am still not happy about this...
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In the middle of the week, Farbjorn came down here from Blue Cedar House to help with a long delayed housey project, the building of a sculptural lighting fixture to bring more ambient light to the living room, which, with no overhead fixture, sorely needed it. Here he is attaching the panel to the ceiling between the front door and the living room; the lights will end up helping to define an entryway space, as well as making the whole room a lot brighter.

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There has been slow if steady progress on my first autumn 6PAC garment, the knitted mini-poncho that I am calling Tweedledee, since the combination of three colors is a warm greyed-turquoise tweedy combination. I have finished the back half, and am now well into the front half. I find it hard to believe that no one has ever posted this pattern to Ravelry before, and that it was so unpopular as to then be discontinued entirely. I guess that the current trend in knitting is everything from the top down, and all in one, while this is knit in pieces and then seamed together. When I finish, I will send a message to the designer, to let her know how much I have enjoyed knitting it. I am certain that it will prove a most useful garment when it cools down again, as it must... eventually...
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earlier this week, I forgot the name of the fridge, and called it the "cold room"... apparently I am not the only one who does things like this:

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

there are no words...


in which our plucky heroine is rendered speechless...

I very unexpectedly ended up being able to go see the full solar eclipse, despite my lack of advance planning... some old friends who live right in the middle of the totality zone in Jefferson Oregon opened up their backyard for an eclipse overnight shindig, and some of my dear Olympia friends (Bill, Cathy, Jen, and Toshi the wonder pup) scooped me up, took me there and back home again afterwards. On eclipse morning, we all set up chairs in the front yard and had a perfect view in a clear sky to watch the moon shadow cross the sun face. my friend Bob set up his camera to take timed photos at set intervals*, while the rest of us sat and chatted, or knit, and all periodically looked up to watch the progress of the moon shadow...
""... Seeing a partial eclipse bears the same relation to seeing a total eclipse as kissing a man does to marrying him... Although the one experience precedes the other, it in no way prepares you for it. During a partial eclipse the sky does not darken—not even when 94 percent of the sun is hidden. Nor does the sun, seen colorless through protective devices, seem terribly strange...

What you see in an eclipse is entirely different from what you know... You do not see the moon. So near the sun, it is as completely invisible as the stars are by day. What you see before your eyes is the sun going through phases. It gets narrower and narrower, as the waning moon does, and, like the ordinary moon, it travels alone in the simple sky. The sky is of course background. It does not appear to eat the sun; it is far behind the sun. The sun simply shaves away; gradually, you see less sun and more sky...

... A piece of sky beside the crescent sun was detaching. It was a loosened circle of evening sky, suddenly lighted from the back. It was an abrupt black body out of nowhere; it was a flat disk; it was almost over the sun. That is when there were screams. At once this disk of sky slid over the sun like a lid. The sky snapped over the sun like a lens cover. The hatch in the brain slammed. Abruptly it was dark night, on the land and in the sky. In the night sky was a tiny ring of light. The hole where the sun belongs is very small. A thin ring of light marked its place.

excerpted from Annie Dillard's 1982 essay "Total Eclipse"

It was so different to actually experience it instead of just reading about it or seeing pictures, or even the one time I saw a partial solar eclipse. The quality of the light kept changing, the wild birds all went to roost in odd places, it gradually cooled off as the light became more plangent, and the heat of the morning was pierced now and again with a wisp of cool breezes. Street lights came on, and then the peak moment arrived!

During totality we could all take off our eclipse glasses and look directly at the sun, seeing the corona in wispy rays surrounding a dark circle. The horizons we could see between the buildings appeared colored as at dawn, only in the entirely wrong places, to the south, and the northeast (I have been told that if on a hilltop, the sunrise colors are the whole circle of the horizon...) I found it to be literally awe inspiring in an almost atavistic physical sense... my legs got shaky, and I found myself waving my arms in the air and hollering (which is not how I usually react to things)

I am so very grateful to have been able to see the eclipse, and will treasure the memory for the rest of my life, as one of my peak experiences ever...

* he then assembled them into one composited image, which gives a sense of what we saw in the eastern sky
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Sunday, August 20, 2017

scavenger hunt Sunday


in which our plucky heroine makes progress...
my pal Randal organised "The Epic Photo Scavenger Hunt", as an online challenge between August 1st and October 31st. There are 67 items on the list, I had six the first week, and the second week added another ten... this week I added another five:
3. something chromed
while my sister was visiting last weekend, we indulged in a trip to 50 Licks, which is my choice for the best ice cream anywhere. (and much better than the oft cited Salt and Straw; when it comes to ice cream, I prefer tasty to quirky) Fortunately the shop is on the far side of the city, and so not a frequent treat. I had never been there on a Saturday night, and there was quite a line, and while we were waiting for our turn at the counter, I saw this vintage soda fountain mixer on the shelves as a decoration...

16. a mackerel
Homage to Andy Warhol, found on the shelves of Uwajimaya.

22. something brass
My sister wanted to visit Pittock Mansion, the big old early 20th C historical house and park on the top of the West Hills, which I had never visited either...

41. water droplets
This was my second attempt. Last Sunday there was a tiny bit of rain during the night, and when I walked out to do chook chores in the morning, these echos of the lovely coolness, dappling the ferns and caught in the spiderwebs were just so perfect an illustration of "water droplets"!

My first try at "water droplets", with the condensation on a glass of ice water on my nightstand, catching the reflections from around the room.

51. a phone booth
I am enjoying how participating in this photo challenge has a way of encouraging me to look more carefully at my surroundings. Somehow I had not noticed until now that most of the MAX stations still have a pay phone. This one is near the stop just north of my local library.

So, have now located 21 of the 67 items on the list, but of course am picking all the low hanging fruit first... Some of the other items will be interesting to stage, or involve additional fun field trips, but other items will be a great challenge if even possible. Some involve learning a few new photography techniques, and others will require me to simply be lucky...