Monday, October 2, 2017

Inktober, visons of gussets, and other tidbits


in which our plucky heroine appreciates tiny bits of postive effort

Inktober is committing to a drawing a day for the whole month. There is a list of one word prompts for inspiration. In the interest of making it feel doable, I am drawing on index cards. The way I perceive it, the challenge works on several levels - to draw every day, and to interpret the daily word-prompt into a concept and image that can be turned into a wee medieval picture.

So far I have done "swift":
and "divided":
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Have been reading about sleeve patterning... not sure if I am more or less confused than when I started this journey, but I definitely have more information to mull over. There are several different issues I am trying to solve for, some specific to my own body configuration, and some inherent in the challenge of getting flat inflexible fabric to allow for movement in more than one axis. My next attempt will be to use two separate sleeve gussets, one at the underarm seam, for movement raising/lowering arm, and one at the seam between the back bodice and the sleeve, a modified motorcycle gusset, for moving the arm forward from the side center... we shall see what happens.
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Last weekend I saw a man taking a pony for a walk. A most dapper man, wearing a western hat, a tailored coat, and jeans, walking along the sidewalk on Lombard towards St Johns, with a beautiful liver chestnut pony with a flaxen mane and tail wearing a halter and lead rope... I have seen a lot of folks taking their pets for a walk on a nice day, but this was a first!
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Please to remember... when it gets terribly difficult to ride the bike forward, it might be a good idea to check bike tire pressure! The new tires apparently become flat without "feeling" flat to the touch. After adding in a substantial amount of additional air, it suddenly became much easier to move forward. I am still Very Happy with the new air pump with attached pressure gauge.

Have been gradually finding things that need mended, or repaired in some way, and just doing it... I found the missing Sterret scribe that I like to use for all kinds of marking, and it was rather frozen in the closed position. Ended up needing to apply a bit of WD40, which soon improved the situation. Then it occurred to me that maybe the same solution would help with my ever-cranky U-lock, which annoys me every time I ride my bike and need to use it, which is pretty often... I worked some of the solvent/lubricant into the lockset, and repeatedly locked and unlocked it... it isn't *great* but it is a LOT easier than it was before. I suppose I will need to reapply it pretty often, but when out and about today, I was able to either lock, or unlock it on one or two tries, instead of the usual ten to thirty or more.

Have also repaired my black/brown shot linen pinafore, which somehow got a tear right in front. Since I don't have any of the fabric set aside for mending, I ended up taking a chunk out of the pocket lining, which matches, and using that to patch the tear. To replace part of the inner pocketing with a different fabric is an invisible repair, and this lets me repair the front with the same fabric I used for the original and get another few years of wear, since I love this pinafore! (which apparently I made back in January 2016, originally intended as a dress, which since it didn't work out, turned into a pinafore which I wear a LOT) The linen is heavy enough for winter, but lighter than my usual denim or corduroy.
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October SMART goals (x=extra)
# THINGS MADE THINGS FIXED THINGS GONE
1 fig cottage syrup (jam) repot spider plantø
2 ø pinafore mendedø
3 ø U-lock loosened ø
4 ø Sterret scribe ø
5 øø ø
6 x ø ø
7 x x ø
8 x x x
9 x x x
10 x x x
11 x x x
12 x x x
13 x x x
14 x x x
15 x x x



3 comments:

  1. Sounds like you are having fun and making purposeful progress.

    ReplyDelete
  2. It is so satisfying to bring things back to usefulness.

    ReplyDelete
  3. You may have already seen this, but just in case...

    Threads has an article about working with square-cut armholes:

    http://tinyurl.com/ybojjhe7

    ReplyDelete